Ethos, Pathos, Logos: The Three Modes of Persuasion (2022)

Modes of Persuasion

Leaders need to prove they are worthy to lead. To do so, they need to convince people of their vision.

Take Steve Jobs’s well-known “How to live before you die” speech at the Stanford Commencement Address in 2005. In it he told people to do what they were passionate about. Life is not so long, after all.

Why was Jobs’ rhetoric so effective?

The short answer: It appealed to the full range of human responses. Ethos, pathos, logos.

Way back in the 4th century B.C.E., the ancient philosopher Aristotle understood the power of these 3 modes of persuasion. In his book Rhetoric, he defined these 3 Greek words.

Ethos, Pathos, Logos are modes of persuasion used to convince others of your position, argument or vision. Ethos means character and it is an appeal to moral principles. Logos means reason and it is an appeal to logic. Pathos means experience or sadness and it is an appeal to emotion.

Ethos

Ultimately, ethos is all about trust.

It’s about establishing the speaker’s credibility, so you can believe what they say. And it’s about presenting an argument with ethical appeal. Indeed, the word “ethics” is derived from ethos.

To get people to listen, the speaker needs to be seen as an experienced and moral figure. They must appear both intelligent and trustworthy. Effective use of ethos makes the audience feel the speaker is a reliable source of information.

Ethos forms the bedrock of any rhetorical argument.

Examples of Ethos

Say you read an article about climate change written by a scientist. They have a doctorate from a prestigious institution. Many awards and years of experience.

You should be inclined to trust what they are saying is at least worth reading. And you may well find some merit in their argument.

On the other hand, think about those times you go against your better wisdom and “read the comments” on YouTube.

(Video) The Three Persuasive Appeals: Logos, Ethos, and Pathos

We might listen to someone we consider amoral or under-informed out of fascination. But we won’t see them as on the level. We won’t buy what they’re selling.

That is because they lack ethos. And ethos appeals to our fundamental need for credible authority.

Take Steve Jobs’ aforementioned “How to live before you die” speech. In it, Jobs crafts a powerful appeal to ethos in two ways.

Firstly, there is the fact of his incredible success. Jobs played instrumental roles not only at Apple, but also NeXT and Pixar.

These broad entrepreneurial achievements are mentioned in his speech. They give him an air of unimpeachable credibility.

But even more important is the way he tells the story of his humble origins and unorthodox path to success.

Jobs speaks about dropping out of college and studying calligraphy. How none of this made much sense at the time from a practical perspective. But later on, it helped him work on font design and branding at Apple.

Then he moves on to speak about the ups and downs of his professional experience. How he was fired from Apple. How he moved between companies, never settling.

We see that he has been successful, despite dealing with adversity. And despite some of his decisions that seemed suspect at the time.

Jobs furthers his authority on “life” by talking about confrontation with death. He describes his pancreatic cancer diagnosis and recovery, and how death helps life by being its antithesis.

The experience validated his choices, because it reminded him that change is inevitable. You will die someday, and nobody knows when. So you should do what you’re passionate about now, while you can.

He drives this home by saying “your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.”

Jobs tells a story that builds up a trustworthy persona. By bringing himself down to the level of the audience, he becomes relatable. By speaking of unorthodox success, he becomes credible.

Logos

Logos is about presenting a logical argument. Or at least the reasonable simulation of one.

It focuses on the details of the message presented to make it credible. It shows the speaker is informed about the subject matter at hand.

(Video) 1050: Ethos, Pathos, Logos: The 3 Modes Of Persuasion by Arthur of The Art of Living on...

Logos appeals to our need for things to make sense. We want facts, figures, structure. We want data from credible sources to back up what is being said, so we can believe it.

With that in mind, logos can be argumentative. There's the potential for exploiting the logical fallacies of competing ideas.

A logical appeal can gain strength by undermining competing ideas.

Examples of logos

Aristotle himself gives a great example of logos at its most fundamental level.

“All men are mortal.

Socrates is a man.

Therefore, Socrates is mortal.”

This is a syllogistic argument. That is to say it’s a three-line logical argument based on deductive reasoning.

The conclusion appears sound based on the premises. Never mind that one of the premises might be a fallacy. The structure is logical.

A contemporary, obvious example of logos is seen in politics. Politicians routinely cite statistics to back up their political agenda. These facts and figures declare the urgency of their policy.

Logos sometimes comes in the form of literal analogy. A one-for-one “if A then B” comparison.

For example, one could say the prohibition of alcohol failed in the 1920s, so it will also fail for marijuana. While this type of logic might be simplistic, it can have a big rhetorical impact.

Pathos

By generating an emotional response, pathos appeals to pity, anger, and/or fear. All those powerful feelings.

The use of pathos is effective because humans are emotional beings. Crafting a story with emotional appeal tugs at the heartstrings. Pathos show the power of the spoken word to incite human togetherness, be it negative or positive.

Pathos creates empathy with the speaker’s point of view. That’s why it’s so important to imbue rhetoric with an emotional tone.

(Video) Modes of Persuasion: Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Kairos

Examples of pathos

Anecdotes are one common example of pathos. Conveying the inner experience of an everyday event, the speaker puts themselves on the same level as their audience.

Consider when someone tells a story about airport security or flying Economy in the middle seat. Dealing with tight economic times. Speaking about childhood turmoil or the death of family members.

These are all super relatable. So of course, politicians and public figures use anecdotes to affect pathos all the time.

Let’s return to Steve Jobs’ 2005 speech. Besides the earlier noted ethos, one also finds plenty of pathos.

We see it when Jobs talks about his upbringing and formative college years.

He was adopted by working class parents. His unwed biological mother couldn’t take care of him. But she made sure his adoptive parents would send him to college.

When he got to college, he felt guilty for using his parents money. They had sacrificed and saved, yet he had no idea what he wanted to do. So he dropped out.

To make ends meet, he returned coke bottles for the deposit. He sat in on college classes he was truly interested in. He slept on the floor of his friend’s dorm room.

In the end, it all worked out.

Jobs ends the story with the following emotional appeal:

"Believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leaves you off the well-worn path. And that will make all the difference."

Most people understand being broke. Being scared and confused. Being guilty.

So the story appeals by stirring empathy. The mythical Jobs was always human, after all. He’s dealt with the exact same issues as the audience he addresses.

Jobs tells the audience to trust their “gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever.” It can be scary to follow passion, but it’s important to do so no matter what. His hardship ended in success, after all.

Later in the speech Jobs mentions how he was fired from Apple. The company he spent most of his adult life building.

(Video) Ethos, Pathos & Logos

Of course, he was eventually re-hired. When he gave this speech, he was the CEO of Apple once more.

But mentioning this event makes Jobs look humble. Everyone can relate to failure.

After hearing the college dropout and Apple firing stories, we can identify emotionally with Jobs. All this pathos make us more likely to accept his rhetoric.

Another means of conveying pathos is through humor. Consider the satirical comedy of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert or The Daily Show.

Comedians Stephen Colbert and Trevor Noah use jokes to present political arguments. They poke fun at the opposition by making them the punchline. And they work with the emotions of audience members.

When they get a laugh, it shows their rhetoric is working. The audience is theirs.

Kairos

And then there’s kairos. Just to make things interesting.

Kairos means “opportune moment.” It reflects the importance of setting and time.

Ethos, pathos, and logos each have their virtues. But Aristotle also tells us we also have to consider “right place, right time.” And right means of expression to reach your audience too.

Rhetoric exists within a particular context. It thus lives or dies based on how appropriate it meets the demands of its moment.

Presented to the wrong audience, the prettiest speech will be immediately forgotten.

Serendipity is not to be taken lightly. Nor is the fleeting nature of time, and the difficulty of “striking when the iron is hot,” so to speak.

To take advantage of kairos, it may even be necessary to engineer new conditions before making your rhetorical appeal. For example, if you’re running a business, you might want to wait until a customer has become loyal before hitting them with your up-sell message.

Kairos is undoubtedly the most slippery piece of Aristotle’s rhetorical puzzle. But the basic takeaway is digestible enough—examine your situation carefully before acting.

Consider your timing and the way you’ve organized your rhetoric. Make sure to accommodate context, and adapt if need be. Think about the changes that might take place in the time between crafting your text and presenting it.

(Video) Modes of persuasion pathos logos ethos

Persuading you to persuade

Red, green, and blue make up all the colors of the rainbow. In the same way, ethos, pathos, and logos make up all the rhetorical appeals that are possible.

And understanding rhetorical strategies is important. Whether you’re in social media marketing, or working as a spokesperson for a nonprofit. It provides a window into how leaders lead, and why people listen.

The means of persuasion are few. The applications are many.

FAQs

What are the 3 modes of persuasion What are the 3 modes of persuasion ethos pathos Athos logos? ›

Modes of Persuasion
  • Ethos. Ethos is a way of convincing your audience of your credibility as a writer. Some credibility can be, in a way, built-in. ...
  • Pathos. Most simply, pathos is the appeal to our human emotions. ...
  • Logos. Logos is the appeal to our logical side.

What are the 3 methods of persuasion explain each? ›

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos are referred to as the 3 Persuasive Appeals (Aristotle coined the terms) and are all represented by Greek words. They are modes of persuasion used to convince audiences.

What are the 3 tools of persuasion? ›

Aristotle coined the terms ethos, logos, and pathos as the three main tools of persuasion. These are used in theatre, in literature, and beyond.

How are ethos pathos and logos used in persuasion? ›

Ethos, Pathos, Logos are modes of persuasion used to convince others of your position, argument or vision. Ethos means character and it is an appeal to moral principles. Logos means reason and it is an appeal to logic. Pathos means experience or sadness and it is an appeal to emotion.

Who used the three persuasive appeals ethos pathos and logos to explain how rhetoric works? ›

Aristotle taught that a speaker's ability to persuade an audience is based on how well the speaker appeals to that audience in three different areas: logos, ethos, and pathos. Considered together, these appeals form what later rhetoricians have called the rhetorical triangle.

What are Aristotle's 3 ways to persuade? ›

Over 2,000 years ago the Greek philosopher Aristotle argued that there were three basic ways to persuade an audience of your position: ethos, logos, and pathos.

How do you identify ethos pathos and logos in writing? ›

Ethos is about establishing your authority to speak on the subject, logos is your logical argument for your point and pathos is your attempt to sway an audience emotionally.

What is an example of ethos pathos and logos? ›

Ethos, Pathos & Logos - YouTube

What are the 3 parts of a persuasive speech? ›

Traditionally, persuasion involves ethos (credibility), logos (logic), and pathos (emotion). By performing these three elements competently, a speaker can enhance their persuasive power.

What are the 3 types of appeals? ›

Aristotle postulated three argumentative appeals: logical, ethical, and emotional. Strong arguments have a balance of all of three, though logical (logos) is essential for a strong, valid argument.

What are the 3 types of persuasive speech to private institution? ›

The subject matter and content of a speech determine what type of persuasive speech it is. There are three different types of persuasive speeches that are used to convince an audience: factual persuasive speech, value persuasive speech and policy persuasive speech.

What are the 3 examples of rhetoric? ›

There are three different rhetorical appeals—or methods of argument—that you can take to persuade an audience: logos, ethos, and pathos.

What are the 3 emotional appeals? ›

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos are three strategies commonly employed when attempting to persuade a reader. Pathos, or the appeal to emotion, means to persuade an audience by purposely evoking certain emotions to make them feel the way the author wants them to feel.

What is ethos example? ›

Ethos in your speech or writing comes from sounding fair or demonstrating your expertise, education or pedigree. Examples of ethos include: As a doctor, I am qualified to tell you that this course of treatment will likely generate the best results.

What is logos and examples? ›

What is logos? Logos is the persuasive technique that aims to convince an audience by using logic and reason. Also called “the logical appeal,” logos examples in advertisment include the citation of statistics, facts, data, charts, and graphs.

Which is more important ethos pathos or logos? ›

Aristotle believed that logos should be the most important of the three persuasive appeals. As a philosopher and a master of logical reasoning, he believed that logos should be the only required persuasive appeal. That is, if you demonstrated logos, you should not need either ethos or pathos.

Why is ethos used? ›

Ethos is the persuasive technique that appeals to an audience by highlighting credibility. Ethos advertisement techniques invoke the superior “character” of a speaker, presenter, writer, or brand. Ethos examples aim to convince the audience that the advertiser is reliable and ethical.

What is an example from your life where you have seen ethos being used? ›

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout's father, Atticus, is using ethos so blatantly, he might as well say, “Hey, jurors, find your ethics and make the right decision.” He's calling each juror out on the carpet, reminding them that no one man is better than any other man in the courtroom or in society as a whole.

What is the importance of the three rhetorical appeals to you as a student? ›

The use of all three rhetorical appeals is referred to as the rhetorical triangle. In the classroom, that could mean using ethos to establish your credibility in the subject matter, using pathos to connect to students, and using logos to make your point with facts and evidence.

Why is it important to use rhetorical appeals? ›

Understanding rhetorical appeals can help writers to build a stronger argument and be more persuasive in their writing. By identifying rhetorical appeals, writers can begin to understand when it is more appropriate to use one method over another.

What is the purpose of Aristotle's three rhetorical appeals? ›

Logos, ethos and pathos are the three rhetorical appeals set out in 350 BC by Aristotle in On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse and used by many today to organize advice on public speaking and how to persuade.

What is the most important means of persuasion? ›

Aristotle considered ethos the most important mode of persuasion. He defined three things that contribute to ethos: good sense (phronesis); good moral character (arête); and.

What is the importance of persuasion in a text speech? ›

10.1 The Purpose of Persuasion

The purpose of persuasion in writing is to convince, motivate, or move readers toward a certain point of view, or opinion. The act of trying to persuade automatically implies more than one opinion on the subject can be argued.

How is ethos used in writing? ›

Ethos FAQs

Ethos uses an author or speaker's credibility and authority as the basis for a written or rhetorical argument. It relies on the writer's good character or reputation to build trust with the audience.

How do you use ethos in a sentence? ›

Examples of ethos in a Sentence

The company made environmental awareness part of its business ethos. They are working to keep a democratic ethos alive in the community.

Why are ethos pathos logos important? ›

Ethos, pathos and logos are modes of persuasion used to convince and appeal to an audience. You need these qualities for your audience to accept your messages.

What is pathos example? ›

Pathos examples in everyday life include: A teenager tries to convince his parents to buy him a new car by saying if they cared about their child's safety they'd upgrade him. A man at the car dealership implores the salesman to offer the best price on a new car because he needs to support his young family.

What does ethos mean? ›

ethos, in rhetoric, the character or emotions of a speaker or writer that are expressed in the attempt to persuade an audience. It is distinguished from pathos, which is the emotion the speaker or writer hopes to induce in the audience.

What are logos used for? ›

What is a logo? A logo is a combination of text and visual imagery that serves two purposes. It tells people the name of the company and it creates a visual symbol that represents your business. Some logos have powerful symbolic association connected to people's memory.

How are the three types of speeches different from one another? ›

To wrap it up, there are essentially three types of speeches public speakers use to influence their audience. The informative speech conveys information, the persuasive speech is a call to action and the special occasion speech is given to commemorate a person or event.

What is a persuasive speech example? ›

1. A teenager attempting to convince her parents that she needs to be able to stay out until 11pm instead of 10pm. 2. A student council president trying to convince school administrators to allow the students to have a dance after the final football game of the season.

What is ethos in a speech? ›

Ethos: The speaker tries to show the audience that he or she is reliable, credible, and trustworthy. The speaker also tries to build a bridge to the audience by using first-person plural pronouns (we, us). Pathos: The speaker appeals to the audience's emotions, using emotional language, sensory images, and anecdotes.

What is type of appeal? ›

There are different ways a speaker or writer can appeal to his or her audience: 1) logic or reason (logos), 2) emotion (pathos), and/or 3) ethics and morals (ethos).

What is appeal to reason examples? ›

definition: a rhetorical strategy where the argument is made by presenting facts that lead the audience to a specific conclusion. examples: “onStar service inside your car is better than carrying a cell phone because a cell phone can't call for you when you're injured.”

What else is important in persuasion apart from the words of your speech? ›

Persuasive speeches may utilize the three modes of persuasion: ethos, pathos and logos. Ethos is the most important appeal in a persuasive speech. Factors such as body language, the willingness of the audience, and the environment in which the speech is given, all affect the success of a persuasive speech.

What are the different types of persuasive techniques? ›

The persuasive strategies used by advertisers who want you to buy their product can be divided into three categories: pathos, logos, and ethos. Pathos: an appeal to emotion. An advertisement using pathos will attempt to evoke an emotional response in the consumer.

Who uses persuasive speech? ›

Individuals use persuasive speeches in a variety of professional capacities, including debates, sales pitches, presentations and legal proceedings. With a plan, preparation and practice, you can influence your audience's or customer's behavior through speech.

What are three reasons for rhetoric? ›

3 reasons why rhetoric is the ultimate model for communication
  • Rhetoric was born with democracy and for democracy. ...
  • Rhetoric is a craft and rhetoricians are not ashamed of it. ...
  • Rhetoric is rooted in a realistic conception of human nature.
7 Apr 2016

How do you start an ethos in a speech? ›

Ethos
  1. Use only credible, reliable sources to build your argument and cite those sources properly.
  2. Respect the reader by stating the opposing position accurately.
  3. Establish common ground with your audience.

How is rhetoric used? ›

Rhetoric is language used to motivate, inspire, inform, or persuade readers and/or listeners. Often, rhetoric uses figures of speech and other literary devices, which are known as rhetorical devices when used in this manner.

Why is emotional appeal important? ›

Emotional Appeals:

Pro: Emotional appeals help to reach the audience on a different, psychological level. They'll make a potential customer “feel something.” It can be helpful to connect with audiences like this because many purchasing decisions are, in fact, based on feelings and emotions.

How do you use emotional appeal in a sentence? ›

There was an emotional appeal because he thought of a thousand years of history. This appeal is the purely emotional appeal, as opposed to the reasoning appeal. I can see the emotional appeal and the symmetry of it. The appeal to revenge is, after all, an emotional appeal.

Why is it important to appeal to the emotions of your audiences? ›

It's to your advantage to appeal to the emotional sides of your audience, as this will increase the likelihood of driving action by convincing people that it is in their best interest.

What logos mean in English? ›

The term logos is used to refer to the use of logic and reasoning in crafting a piece of persuasive writing or rhetoric. Building a logical case can take time and effort, but understanding logos and being able to make effective logical appeals can elevate your writing and help engage your reader.

Does pathos mean emotion? ›

Pathos Entered English in the 1500s

The Greek word páthos means "experience, misfortune, emotion, condition,” and comes from Greek path-, meaning “experience, undergo, suffer.” In English, pathos usually refers to the element in an experience or in an artistic work that makes us feel compassion, pity, or sympathy.

How do you use pathos in a sentence? ›

How to use Pathos in a sentence. The dramatic performance was rich in sad pathos and left the audience with teary eyes. The pathos of the Children's Crusade of 1212 only nerved him to fresh efforts.

How is pathos used? ›

When we talk about 'feeling all the feels', that's pathos. Advertisers often use pathos to appeal to an audience's emotions, like making them feel sorry for their subject. They might also make their audience feel angry towards something, so that they're motivated to take action.

How do you use logos in a sentence? ›

Logos sentence example. The immutability of God requires the eternity of the Logos and of the world. Christ himself was the Logos, the Reason. The Logos existed before creation and time; was with the very God and was God; and all things were made through Him.

What is an example of an appeal that uses pathos? ›

Pathos: Appeal to Emotions

For example, many of us have seen the ASPCA commercials that use photographs of injured puppies, or sad-looking kittens, and slow, depressing music to emotionally persuade their audience to donate money.

Which three appeals do you think is best for use in persuading others? ›

Generally, pathos is most effective when used in the introduction and conclusion.

What is the most powerful form of persuasion? ›

Pathos appeals to an audience's sense of anger, sorrow, or excitement. Aristotle argued that logos was the strongest and most reliable form of persuasion; the most effective form of persuasion, however, utilizes all three appeals.

Why is ethos important in a speech? ›

Ethos is all about credibility—is the source coming from research that is reliable and has a good reputation? A writer can use ethos to show readers why they are the best person to be writing or talking about a particular topic or issue.

How is ethos created? ›

You can establish ethos—or credibility—in two basic ways: you can use or build your own credibility on a topic, or you can use credible sources, which, in turn, builds your credibility as a writer.

How do you identify ethos pathos and logos? ›

Ethos is about establishing your authority to speak on the subject, logos is your logical argument for your point and pathos is your attempt to sway an audience emotionally.

How do you use ethos pathos and logos? ›

Logos appeals to the audience's reason, building up logical arguments. Ethos appeals to the speaker's status or authority, making the audience more likely to trust them. Pathos appeals to the emotions, trying to make the audience feel angry or sympathetic, for example.

What is a real life example of logos? ›

Logos is when we use cold arguments – like data, statistics, or common sense – to convince people of something, rather than trying to appeal to an audience's emotions. Here's an example of logos in action from our man Aristotle himself: All men are mortal. Socrates is a man.

How do you describe an ethos essay? ›

Ethos – Calls to human ethics; the author establishes a sense of persuasion through the use of their own credibility, status, professionalism, research, or the credibility of their sources. EX: If my years as a Marine taught me anything, it's that caution is the best policy in this sort of situation.

What is my personal ethos? ›

It's how you describe your ideal character, with respect to your actions and your interactions with others. You might also hear it called a creed or a code of conduct. A good place to start is to spend some time thinking about what your values are.

Why is it important to know who your audience is when making a persuasive appeal? ›

Once you know who your intended audience is and what your purpose is for writing, you can make specific decisions about how to shape your message. No matter what, you want your audience to stick around long enough to read your whole piece.

How can using persuasive appeals make writing stronger? ›

The three persuasive appeals, which are ethos, pathos, and logos, are the building blocks of argumentation. Being able to identify them in other arguments—and being able to successfully incorporate them into your own arguments—will make you a more effective rhetor (someone who makes a written or oral argument).

How do you appeal to your audience in writing? ›

5 Ways to Write Better Content and Appeal to Your Audience
  1. Identify audience. One of the most important first steps before you start writing is to identify your audience. ...
  2. Be positive. Always keep this in mind, write positively. ...
  3. Benefits oriented. ...
  4. Simple sentences. ...
  5. Revise, then do it again.
21 Nov 2013

How do rhetorical appeals influence an audience? ›

Rhetorical appeals are persuasive because they allow the speaker to persuade an audience without having to provide all of the facts or details that would otherwise be necessary for a logical argument (see Chapter 3). Rhetorical appeal works by appealing to the emotions of the audience rather than their intellects.

How do you analyze a rhetorical speech? ›

In writing an effective rhetorical analysis, you should discuss the goal or purpose of the piece; the appeals, evidence, and techniques used and why; examples of those appeals, evidence, and techniques; and your explanation of why they did or didn't work.

What are the 3 types of appeals? ›

Aristotle postulated three argumentative appeals: logical, ethical, and emotional. Strong arguments have a balance of all of three, though logical (logos) is essential for a strong, valid argument.

What are the three modes of persuasion in rhetoric? ›

The modes of persuasion, modes of appeal or rhetorical appeals (Greek: pisteis) are strategies of rhetoric that classify a speaker's or writer's appeal to their audience. These include ethos, pathos, and logos, all three of which appear in Aristotle's Rhetoric.

What is ethos pathos logos and kairos? ›

The concepts of ethos, pathos, logos, and kairos are also called the modes of persuasion, ethical strategies, or rhetorical appeals. They have a lot of different applications ranging from everyday interactions with others to big political speeches to effective advertising.

What is ethos persuasion? ›

Ethos is a Greek word meaning 'character'. In terms of persuasive language, it is an appeal to authority and credibility. Ethos is a means of convincing an audience of the reliable character or credibility of the speaker/writer, or the credibility of the argument.

What are the 3 types of persuasive speech to private institution? ›

The subject matter and content of a speech determine what type of persuasive speech it is. There are three different types of persuasive speeches that are used to convince an audience: factual persuasive speech, value persuasive speech and policy persuasive speech.

What are the 3 examples of rhetoric? ›

There are three different rhetorical appeals—or methods of argument—that you can take to persuade an audience: logos, ethos, and pathos.

What are the 3 emotional appeals? ›

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos are three strategies commonly employed when attempting to persuade a reader. Pathos, or the appeal to emotion, means to persuade an audience by purposely evoking certain emotions to make them feel the way the author wants them to feel.

How do you use modes of persuasion? ›

How to use the modes of persuasion
  1. Establish your credibility. ...
  2. Share personal experiences. ...
  3. Show why others should trust you. ...
  4. Use descriptive language. ...
  5. Present data to back up your argument. ...
  6. Look for (or create) the ideal time to present.
7 Jul 2021

What are the models of persuasion? ›

Changing Minds: 4 Scientific Models of Persuasion
  • Carl Hoveland's Model of Persuasion. Carl Hoveland was a psychologist who studied attitude changes and persuasion. ...
  • Two-Sided Messages Model of Persuasion. ...
  • The Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion. ...
  • Blaise Pascal's Method for Persuasion.
8 Dec 2020

How do you identify the modes of persuasion? ›

Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.

What is ethos example? ›

Ethos in your speech or writing comes from sounding fair or demonstrating your expertise, education or pedigree. Examples of ethos include: As a doctor, I am qualified to tell you that this course of treatment will likely generate the best results.

What is ethos in an essay? ›

Ethos – Calls to human ethics; the author establishes a sense of persuasion through the use of their own credibility, status, professionalism, research, or the credibility of their sources.

What does pathos mean in writing? ›

Pathos is an appeal made to an audience's emotions in order to evoke feeling. Pathos is one of the three primary modes of persuasion, along with logos and ethos. Pathos is a also a key component of literature which, like most other forms of art, is designed to inspire emotion from its readers.

What is pathos example? ›

Pathos examples in everyday life include: A teenager tries to convince his parents to buy him a new car by saying if they cared about their child's safety they'd upgrade him. A man at the car dealership implores the salesman to offer the best price on a new car because he needs to support his young family.

What is pathos used for? ›

Pathos - The Emotional Appeal

Pathos is to persuade by appealing to the audience's emotions. As the speaker, you want the audience to feel the same emotions you feel about something, you want to emotionally connect with them and influence them.

What are logos examples? ›

Logos is when we use cold arguments – like data, statistics, or common sense – to convince people of something, rather than trying to appeal to an audience's emotions. Here's an example of logos in action from our man Aristotle himself: All men are mortal. Socrates is a man.

Videos

1. What Aristotle and Joshua Bell can teach us about persuasion - Conor Neill
(TED-Ed)
2. ETHOS, LOGOS & PATHOS: THE MODES OF PERSUASION
(Together WeLEN)
3. Modes of Persuasion: Ethos, Pathos & Logos
(Victoria McCrady)
4. How to use rhetoric to get what you want - Camille A. Langston
(TED-Ed)
5. Ethos, Pathos, & Logos: How to Use Persuasive Ad Techniques
(StudioBinder)
6. An Introduction to Ethos, Logos and Pathos
(Christianity 9 to 5)

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Hobby: Yoga, Electronics, Rafting, Lockpicking, Inline skating, Puzzles, scrapbook

Introduction: My name is Clemencia Bogisich Ret, I am a super, outstanding, graceful, friendly, vast, comfortable, agreeable person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.